Symphony In Space With Chris Hadfield

February 20, 2017

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The moment Chris Hadfield took to the stage of the Rebecca Cohn Theatre, the room filled with applause. After reading up on the decorated Colonel’s past achievements, it is not hard to see why the man is held in such high esteem. One of the first Canadian space shuttle crew members for NASA, Hadfield has gone on to work with iconic space projects such as Canadarm, Mir, and the International Space Station. He has been on three separate space expeditions, orbited Earth 2600 times, and has published three books just for good measure, making him a household name for Canadians.

Click below to read full article at Halifax Bloggers:

Symphony In Space

Heavy

The Bus Stop Theatre continues its new season of its Re-Fringed event with Taylor Olson‘s outstanding one man show Heavy. Over the course of an hour, Olson takes the audience on a powerful, introspective journey whereby his autobiographical story entailing drastic weight loss and weight gain is unfolded in vivid and unforgettable detail. 

Click below to read full article at Halifax Bloggers:

Heavy

Major Motion Picture

 

Interpretative dance is an interesting creature in that it is offered a greater degree of freedom than its fellow artistic counterparts. As such, therein lies the question: how interpretative can interpretive dance be before sacrificing coherent narration?

Read full Halifax Bloggers article here:

Major Motion Picture

Kim’s Convenience

 

Neptune Theatre‘s newest production, Kim’s Convenience, boasts some successes while also playing host to a myriad of missteps. Penned by playwright Ins Choi, the audience is welcomed to watch a day in the life faced by so many immigrant families in our country. At the centre of this journey, we have Appa, the stern and stoic patriarch who operates his convenience store with steely purpose (a method also aptly reflected in his parenting style). Actor Paul Sun-Hyung Lee portrays his Korean iron-fisted lead well; Appa is a mountain— both proud and stubborn— and he proceeds to obliviously blur the line between the two throughout the course of the play.

Read full review on Halifax Bloggers:

Kim’s Convenience