The Little Years

Matchstick Theatre closes out its season with its sixth and best show to date, John Mighton’s The Little Years. Better balanced and more accessible than its predecessors Bone Cage and The Woodcutter, and just as captivating as 59 Minutes and Bitter Rose, The Little Years holds your attention from start to end. As I’ve mentioned in previous reviews, Matchstick Theatre is gaining traction, and the proof is in the proverbial pudding with the talent reeled in for this show.

For full review, visit: The Little Years

 

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Shakespeare In Love

There’s a good chance you’re going to enjoy Neptune Theatre’s take on Shakespeare in Love. Directed by Jeremy Webb, the play features a host of local Halifax actors, all of whom work to make this play a more comedic venture than I recall the movie being.

Sarah English as Viola and Allister MacDonald as Will in Shakespeare in Love. - NEPTUNE THEATRE

Allister MacDonald nails down the role of William Shakespeare, a writer toiling in relative obscurity. Fresh off a tepidly received performance of The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Shakespeare is in the midst of a stressful predicament: He’s sold his next unwritten play, Romeo and Ethel, the Pirate’s Daughter to two different people. Things are complicated further thanks to a crippling case of writer’s block—he’s unable to write anything of substance unless its spoon-fed to him by his friend and contemporary Christopher Marlowe (a charming Wayne Burns), or has a dog doing tricks. Toss in the extra stressor that his ragtag group of actors are less than impressive and Shakespeare’s a big ole ball of nerves. It’s not until he meets a prodigious acting talent named Thomas Kent (a wealthy elite named Viola de Lesseps in drag), that the curse is lifted. After quickly discovering Viola’s true identity, the two begin an affair, thus rekindling Shakespeare’s passion and giving birth to Romeo and Juliet.

For full review, visit:

Shakespeare In Love

The Woodcutter

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Matchstick Theatre ventures deep into the forest with The Woodcutter, a play written by Don Hannah and helmed by its resident director Jake Planinc. An ambitious one-hander, the show rests on the performance of its only actor, Sébastien Labelle. Labelle surrenders himself entirely to the role of Ted, a man navigating the dark forest that is the extensively transformed Bus Stop Theatre.

For full review, visit

The Woodcutter

The Argyle Street Kitchen Party

It was minutes into Argyle Street Kitchen Party when singer/songwriter Ian Sherwoodinvited audience members to come sit onstage during the performance. Imagine my surprise when, while laughing cordially at the offer, I was whisked to the seats in a random spur-of-the-moment decision by my girlfriend. Perched on a stool behind a counter in a very lifelike kitchen, the decision to relocate instantly proved to be a good one. The ensuing performance by Sherwood and fellow musicians Karen LizotteCelia Koughan, and Malia Rogers celebrates the beloved Maritime institution, the kitchen party. Fun and infectious, their energy quickly permeated from those sitting mere inches away to the audience members who stayed in their seats.Screen Shot 2018-07-09 at 4.30.13 PM.png

 

For full review, visit:

The Argyle Street Kitchen Party

Obstacle Fest

Terra Novella Theatre’s newest adventure, Obstacle Festis built on the simple, unspoken fact that some of the best theatrical moments happen when something goes horribly wrong. A single, unexpected mishap has the make-or-break ability to change the course of a play.

Obstacle Fest is a mixed-bag in terms of its comedic highs and lows. Written, directed, and acted by both newcomers and veterans of the stage, the event features many delightful actors who carried their scenes despite their particular limitations. In other moments, actors went overboard with hammed-up performances and mugging to the audience, which ended up proving that some obstacles can end up working against a play as a whole.

For full review, visit:

Obstacle Fest

 

 

 

Landline

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Truth be told, I’ve never really been one for meditation or deep introspection. I am, in many ways, quite guarded emotionally-speaking. I can be frustratingly socially-awkward and self-conscious, and so self-reflective, open-ended, and abstract lines of thinking are often quite difficult for me to embrace.

Halifax’s XOTHEATRE seems to thrive on secrecy. I had little idea of what to expect, and what preconceptions I initially had proved quickly to be incorrect. The location is a secret, and only two people can attend, (for lack of a better word), a “performance,” at a time. You get hooked up with an iPod Shuffle, headphones, and a phone number on your cell belonging to a stranger in Victoria, British Columbia, who is simultaneously doing the exact same thing as you. So start walking and prepare for further instructions.

For full review, click here:

Landline