Tompkinsville

 

In Eastern Front Theatre‘s newest production, author/performer Lindsay Kyte gives viewers a different taste of Cape Breton history. From its onset, Tompkinsville firmly establishes itself in the 1930s town of Reserve Mine where the stark flavour of defeat hangs heavy in the air; men and their families are being oppressed by the almost omnipresent Dominion Company which has no qualms about giving the town inhabitants far less than their fair share.

 

Read full Halifax Bloggers article here:

Tompkinsville

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Major Motion Picture

 

Interpretative dance is an interesting creature in that it is offered a greater degree of freedom than its fellow artistic counterparts. As such, therein lies the question: how interpretative can interpretive dance be before sacrificing coherent narration?

Read full Halifax Bloggers article here:

Major Motion Picture

David Sedaris’ Uncomfortable Christmas Holiday Fun Time Hour!

uncomfortable-christmas-feature

Kim’s Convenience

 

Neptune Theatre‘s newest production, Kim’s Convenience, boasts some successes while also playing host to a myriad of missteps. Penned by playwright Ins Choi, the audience is welcomed to watch a day in the life faced by so many immigrant families in our country. At the centre of this journey, we have Appa, the stern and stoic patriarch who operates his convenience store with steely purpose (a method also aptly reflected in his parenting style). Actor Paul Sun-Hyung Lee portrays his Korean iron-fisted lead well; Appa is a mountain— both proud and stubborn— and he proceeds to obliviously blur the line between the two throughout the course of the play.

Read full review on Halifax Bloggers:

Kim’s Convenience